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Thursday, December 11

  1. page Home edited ... Pyramys and Thisbe: characters played by the “rude mechanicals” who provide a reflection of wh…
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    Pyramys and Thisbe: characters played by the “rude mechanicals” who provide a reflection of what could have happened with the young lovers
    The setting of the woods is extremely important in this play. This is where the young lovers retreat to in attempt to solve their relationship woes. During their time in the woods, their relationships become immensely more complex, thanks to Puck, or Robin Goodfellow’s “love potion”. Puck is instructed by Oberon to put the love potion into the eyes of Demetrius so that he will fall in love with Helena. He mistakenly uses the potion on Lysander instead, and near-insanity ensues.
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    their mates.
    Dramatic irony, or having the audience possess information that the characters are not privy to, is an important aspect of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Puck’s love potion debacle is known step-by-step to the audience, but a tremendous amount of confusion and consequent irony occurs because the young lovers are unaware that they are under the influence of Puck’s mistakenly placed love potion.
    In the end, Oberon and Puck manage to help the young lovers avoid tragedy, and a group wedding is held. Theseus allows Hermia and Lysander to marry, as well and Helena and Demetrius. Following this, Puck speaks directly to the audience, suggesting that if they have been offended, the entire occurrence was merely a dream.
    (view changes)
    10:36 am
  2. page Annotations edited To start this project each group member chose a different aspect of William Shakespeare’s A Mids…

    To start this project each group member chose a different aspect of William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream to research. The research consisted of each member finding their own criticism through books, online journals, and scholarly websites. The different topics that our group researched were: characters, themes, structure, plot, setting, Shakespearean Comedy, gender roles, and different adaptations of the play. Each different topic correlates with one another. Combining every members research a better understanding of the play was accomplished, as this play is difficult to understand.
    Mallory Kemp's Annotations:
    The three plays in Shakespeare's canon that do not have a primary source are The Tempest,Love's Labour's Lost and A Midsummer Night's Dream. Midsummer is the only one with an elaborate plot. In his critique of the play, Harold Bloom renounces beliefs that bestiality and violence are central themes. He also states that Bottom and Puck are the main characters, because they are opposites of one another and their qualities are found in all people.The lovers are secondary to the plot. Demetrius and Lysandar are interchangeable, and it does not matter who is matched with whom.
    (view changes)
    9:21 am
  3. page Home edited ... Oberon and Titania, the King and Queen of the Fairies Pyramys and Thisbe: characters played b…
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    Oberon and Titania, the King and Queen of the Fairies
    Pyramys and Thisbe: characters played by the “rude mechanicals” who provide a reflection of what could have happened with the young lovers
    {shakespeare.jpg} TheThe setting of
    A Midsummer Night’s Dream contains a “play within a play”, an element that Shakespeare uses in other works such as Hamlet. This play, “Pyramus and Thisbe” is performed by the rude mechanicals, and is a rather botched presentation. Putting its silliness aside, the performance is extremely relevant to the plot because it provides an example of what kind of devastating events could have occurred had the lovers not harmoniously reunited with their mates.
    Dramatic irony, or having the audience possess information that the characters are not privy to, is an important aspect of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Puck’s love potion debacle is known step-by-step to the audience, but a tremendous amount of confusion and consequent irony occurs because the young lovers are unaware that they are under the influence of Puck’s mistakenly placed love potion.
    (view changes)
    7:18 am
  4. page Home edited ... Oberon and Titania, the King and Queen of the Fairies Pyramys and Thisbe: characters played b…
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    Oberon and Titania, the King and Queen of the Fairies
    Pyramys and Thisbe: characters played by the “rude mechanicals” who provide a reflection of what could have happened with the young lovers
    The{shakespeare.jpg} The setting of
    A Midsummer Night’s Dream contains a “play within a play”, an element that Shakespeare uses in other works such as Hamlet. This play, “Pyramus and Thisbe” is performed by the rude mechanicals, and is a rather botched presentation. Putting its silliness aside, the performance is extremely relevant to the plot because it provides an example of what kind of devastating events could have occurred had the lovers not harmoniously reunited with their mates.
    Dramatic irony, or having the audience possess information that the characters are not privy to, is an important aspect of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Puck’s love potion debacle is known step-by-step to the audience, but a tremendous amount of confusion and consequent irony occurs because the young lovers are unaware that they are under the influence of Puck’s mistakenly placed love potion.
    (view changes)
    7:17 am
  5. file shakespeare.jpg uploaded
    7:15 am
  6. page Annotations edited ... DiGangi, Mario. “Inspired by A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Barnes &am…
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    DiGangi, Mario. “Inspired by A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Barnes & Noble Shakespeare). Ed. Mario DiGangi. New York: Barnes & Noble Publishing, 2007. 257-265.
    This book chapter highlights every major work that has been created as the result of being inspired by Shakespeare’s A Midsummer NIght’s Dream. It is separated into four categories (theater, music and dance, film, and visual arts) and discusses adaptations spanning from early stage productions such as The Merry Conceited Humours of Bottom the Weaver to Puck magazine; Woody Allen’s A Midsummer Night’s Sex Comedy to Henry Fuseli’s Midsummer portraits; and Felix Mendelssohn’s Overture to A Midsummer Night’s Dream to the Off-Broadway hit The Donkey Show: A Midsummer Night’s Disco.
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    Nov. 2008 <http://search.ebscohost.com>.<**http://search.ebscohost.com**>.**
    John R. Ford’s article discusses two recent film and televised adaptations of William Shakespeare's play "A Midsummer Night's Dream." Ford states Christine Edzard's "The Children's Midsummer Night's Dream" presents a challenge against the opposing structures of theatrical spaces and the theatrical and cinematic conventions that both exist in her film. Peter Bowker and Ed Fraiman's television adaptation, "A Midsummer Night's Dream," is then examined. According to Ford, the adaptation manifests a “meta-meta-consciousness” through its taking place in a Shakesperean Theme Park (known as Dream Park) that functions as a type of retreat for troubled couples.
    (view changes)
    7:13 am
  7. page Annotations edited ... <http://www.webpages.uidaho.edu> Ian Sheddan's Annotations: ... Nov. 2008 <**htt…
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    <http://www.webpages.uidaho.edu>
    Ian Sheddan's Annotations:
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    Nov. 2008 <**http://www.english.emory.edu/classes/Shakespeare_Illustrated/MidsummerPaintings.html**>.<http://www.english.emory.edu/classes/Shakespeare_Illustrated/MidsummerPaintings.html>.
    Created by the English Department at Emory University, this webpage contains a list of painting that deal only with the fairy world and their king and queen, Oberon and Titania, found within A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The page states that seventeenth and eighteenth-century adaptations “stretch the truth” and should be called “dismemberments.” These “dismemberments” were the result of their creators’ using their imagination to interpret what they thought Midsummer was about rather than having the opportunity of seeing it performed. The page includes works by William Blake, Henry Fuseli, and more.
    DiGangi, Mario. “Inspired by A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Barnes & Noble Shakespeare). Ed. Mario DiGangi. New York: Barnes & Noble Publishing, 2007. 257-265.
    This book chapter highlights every major work that has been created as the result of being inspired by Shakespeare’s A Midsummer NIght’s Dream. It is separated into four categories (theater, music and dance, film, and visual arts) and discusses adaptations spanning from early stage productions such as The Merry Conceited Humours of Bottom the Weaver to Puck magazine; Woody Allen’s A Midsummer Night’s Sex Comedy to Henry Fuseli’s Midsummer portraits; and Felix Mendelssohn’s Overture to A Midsummer Night’s Dream to the Off-Broadway hit The Donkey Show: A Midsummer Night’s Disco.
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    Nov. 2008 <**http://search.ebscohost.com**>.<http://search.ebscohost.com>.
    John R. Ford’s article discusses two recent film and televised adaptations of William Shakespeare's play "A Midsummer Night's Dream." Ford states Christine Edzard's "The Children's Midsummer Night's Dream" presents a challenge against the opposing structures of theatrical spaces and the theatrical and cinematic conventions that both exist in her film. Peter Bowker and Ed Fraiman's television adaptation, "A Midsummer Night's Dream," is then examined. According to Ford, the adaptation manifests a “meta-meta-consciousness” through its taking place in a Shakesperean Theme Park (known as Dream Park) that functions as a type of retreat for troubled couples.
    (view changes)
    7:13 am
  8. page Annotations edited ... <http://www.webpages.uidaho.edu> Ian Sheddan's Annotations: ... Nov. 2008 <http:…
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    <http://www.webpages.uidaho.edu>
    Ian Sheddan's Annotations:
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    Nov. 2008 <http://www.english.emory.edu/classes/Shakespeare_Illustrated/MidsummerPaintings.html>.<**http://www.english.emory.edu/classes/Shakespeare_Illustrated/MidsummerPaintings.html**>.
    Created by the English Department at Emory University, this webpage contains a list of painting that deal only with the fairy world and their king and queen, Oberon and Titania, found within A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The page states that seventeenth and eighteenth-century adaptations “stretch the truth” and should be called “dismemberments.” These “dismemberments” were the result of their creators’ using their imagination to interpret what they thought Midsummer was about rather than having the opportunity of seeing it performed. The page includes works by William Blake, Henry Fuseli, and more.
    DiGangi, Mario. “Inspired by A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Barnes & Noble Shakespeare). Ed. Mario DiGangi. New York: Barnes & Noble Publishing, 2007. 257-265.
    This book chapter highlights every major work that has been created as the result of being inspired by Shakespeare’s A Midsummer NIght’s Dream. It is separated into four categories (theater, music and dance, film, and visual arts) and discusses adaptations spanning from early stage productions such as The Merry Conceited Humours of Bottom the Weaver to Puck magazine; Woody Allen’s A Midsummer Night’s Sex Comedy to Henry Fuseli’s Midsummer portraits; and Felix Mendelssohn’s Overture to A Midsummer Night’s Dream to the Off-Broadway hit The Donkey Show: A Midsummer Night’s Disco.
    ...
    Nov. 2008 <http://search.ebscohost.com>.**<**http://search.ebscohost.com**>.
    John R. Ford’s article discusses two recent film and televised adaptations of William Shakespeare's play "A Midsummer Night's Dream." Ford states Christine Edzard's "The Children's Midsummer Night's Dream" presents a challenge against the opposing structures of theatrical spaces and the theatrical and cinematic conventions that both exist in her film. Peter Bowker and Ed Fraiman's television adaptation, "A Midsummer Night's Dream," is then examined. According to Ford, the adaptation manifests a “meta-meta-consciousness” through its taking place in a Shakesperean Theme Park (known as Dream Park) that functions as a type of retreat for troubled couples.
    (view changes)
    7:12 am

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